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Life in Newfoundland

Last day of winter, on satellite

Today was the last day of winter and because it was so nice and clear I checked the daily satellite photos, which showed Newfoundland in all of its wintry splendour:

Sea ice, snow, and wispy clouds over Atlantic Canada – NASA Worldview

A closer look at Newfoundland – NASA Worldview

Isn’t she a beauty?

You can clearly see the ‘river of sea ice’ flowing down the Labrador coast and splitting up just above the Great Northern Peninsula, you can also see that snow is starting to melt on the Avalon: get ready for a beautiful spring! 🙂

As always, you can check out these satellite images for yourself over at NASA.

Otter slide in Small Point Cove

It’s always nice to see otters when you’re out on the coast, especially when they’re being playful.

Here’s a scene I came upon five years ago when I was hiking the East Coast Trail above Spout Cove, one of the many scenic places on Stiles Cove Path:

Otter snow slide – Stiles Cove Path

The otter itself was nowhere to be seen, but it was easy to see evidence of its playful behaviour: first the animal climbed all the way up to the highest snowy point on the cliffs, then it used the ‘snow slide’ to get all the way back down again – the fun way. Needless to say these otter shenanigans brought a smile to my face!

Strong wind over Newfoundland

When it’s windy outside I like to have a look at the wind map over at Earth Wind Map, which shows you just how strong the wind is, where it’s coming from, and what it’s likely to blow in to shore from the open ocean, like for example oceangoing birds, and at this time of year maybe even a few icebergs!

Earth Wind Map – March 11, 2017

Update

Yesterday’s storm was very powerful with extreme gusts that caused serious damage:

Top wind gusts by CBC Meteorologist Ryan Snoddon

East Coast Trail Guide, Version 1.4

This winter I’ve been putting a lot of work into the next big update of the East Coast Trail Guide, my book about Newfoundland’s amazing East Coast Trail. Today I’m very pleased to announce the update is ready and available on iBooks, well in time for the new hiking season!

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This update brings several major improvements to the book and countless little ones, making it both a better read and a more useful guide.

Here’s what’s new in version 1.4:

  • Many sections of the book have been rewritten.
  • Beautiful new overview maps have been added to the Trails chapter, providing an easier way of finding suitable hikes near you.
  • Trail Preview pop-ups have been added to the free sample chapter.
  • The Witless Bay Ecological Reserve has an updated map and a brand new cover photo.
  • Spout Path has a beautiful new cover photo too.
  • Four mini-descriptions have been added to the ‘Other Berries’ section.
  • A temperature chart has been added to the Seasons chapter.
  • Last year’s spawning dates have been added to the Capelin Calendar pop-up.
  • Broken web-links have been updated or replaced.
  • Author contact information has been updated.
  • Many more little improvements have been made throughout the book.

Get it on iBooks

This update is a free download for readers who already have the book, available through the update function in your iBooks app on iPad, iPhone or Mac.

New readers curious what the East Coast Trail Guide is all about can learn more about it here, or get the free sample chapter on the iBooks Store.

Dawn on Witless Bay

Six years ago today I went out to see Venus and the crescent moon rise together over Witless Bay.

At -17 °C it was a cold morning but with little to no wind it was still quite pleasant, and very peaceful. The reason for picking this location for shooting the moonrise was Gull Island, one of the islands in the Witless Bay Ecological Reserve, that I wanted to frame in the foreground:

Venus and the crescent moon rise over Gull Island - Witless Bay

Venus and the crescent moon rise over Gull Island – Witless Bay

As you can see the moonlight on the water was brilliant and bright, but lean in a little closer and you can even see some venuslight on the water!

Satisfied with the shot I came for, I waited for the sun to rise to photograph all the interesting pieces of ice and frozen rocks on the beach:

Pebbles frozen onto bigger rocks - Bears Cove Head

Pebbles frozen onto bigger rocks – Bears Cove Head

Shard of ice glowing in the sunlight - Bears Cove Head

Shard of ice glowing in the sunlight – Bears Cove Head

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Frozen beach rocks at sunrise – Bears Cove Head

All in all it was a beautiful morning!

Newfoundland sea ice seen from space

Today was a beautiful day, the skies were so clear almost all of Newfoundland was visible from space:

Newfoundland seen from space - February 23, 2017

Newfoundland seen from space – February 23, 2017

As you can see there’s quite a bit of sea ice coming down iceberg alley, and hopefully we’ll soon find out if it makes it all the way down to St. John’s this year…

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