You never know what you’ll find during a hike on the East Coast Trail. Whales and icebergs, sure, they’re great, but let’s be honest you’re expecting them, they’re in the brochure.

Now what about this, a beach with oddly coloured water:

Funny colours at Herring Cove - Brigus Head Path

Funny colours at Herring Cove – Brigus Head Path

There are plenty of coves on the East Coast Trail where the water is so crystal clear it almost looks tropical, but that’s not what’s going here. What is going on? The name of the cove offers a clue.

Here’s another shot of this beach, this time from above:

Same Herring Cove, different angle - Brigus Head Path

Same Herring Cove, different angle – Brigus Head Path

You can now see the water is not clear at all, it’s quite turbid…

The lack of waves or a river stirring things up leads me to believe this is a spawning event, most likely an Atlantic herring spawning! These fish gather in the coves just like capelin, but instead of beaching themselves they spawn in the shallow waters instead, turning the surf into an aqua-blue soup…

After studying Herring Cove for a while I continued my hike around Brigus Head, checking to see if the other coves had turned blue too.

Towering East Coast Trail cliffs - Brigus Head Path

Towering East Coast Trail cliffs – Brigus Head Path

Brigus Head junction - Brigus Head Path

Brigus Head junction – Brigus Head Path

The ocean-facing coves were all clear, but on the other side of the headland I had a picture perfect view of Tar Cove where I saw the same familiar milky colour in the shallows:

Beautiful Tar Cove - Brigus Head Path

Beautiful Tar Cove – Brigus Head Path

How about that, a beautiful day with some beautiful sights! If you keep your eyes and ears open, you too will find lots of surprises on the East Coast Trail. 🙂

Not far beyond Tar Cove I reached Admirals Cove, the end of the trail, from where I took the muddy inland route back to Brigus South:

Brigus Head Path is one of the few trails that can easily be hiked as a loop.