Yesterday’s semi clear skies gave NASA’s satellites a good look at the advancing sea ice:

Yesterday's satellite image of Newfoundland – Image Credit: NASA/GSFC, Rapid Response

Yesterday’s satellite image of Newfoundland – Image Credit: NASA/GSFC, Rapid Response

In my previous sea ice update I did not make a clear distinction between the clouds and the ice below it. It’s sort of hard to see if you’re not used to looking at images like this, so I added some annotation to this closer look at the east coast:

Advancing sea ice – Image Credit: NASA/GSFC, Rapid Response

Advancing sea ice – Image Credit: NASA/GSFC, Rapid Response

In this version you can clearly see that the ice has a different ‘texture’, more connected and complex than the puffy structure of yesterday’s clouds. NASA’s satellite page also offers false colour images, in which it is much easier separating ice from clouds:

Band 7-2-1 version – Image Credit: NASA/GSFC, Rapid Response

Band 7-2-1 version – Image Credit: NASA/GSFC, Rapid Response

As before I can’t make predictions as to when or even if this ice will reach the east coast. The only thing this satellite photo shows me is that the sea ice has moved about 150 kilometre south in the last 10 days. I will keep an eye on it for sure!