Today I was in Logy Bay from 9 AM until 3PM, watching the iceberg that has grounded there. This particular iceberg has been changing daily since we first saw it, parts are falling off the berg and I decided today was my day to witness this. I had 3 camera batteries filled to capacity and the reason I left at 3PM is that all 3 were exhausted… I’ve made a lot of photos and used a small point & shoot camera to film the iceberg from every angle, hoping it would explode while being on video. Unfortunately, just moments before the iceberg eventually gave birth to a baby berg, the batteries on the point & shoot went dead.

I did see all the action though, the berg had been making loud booming noises all morning, announcing the inevitable. After a particularly deep and gut wrenching roar, the iceberg finally collapsed into the bay. The resulting wave could have turned over a small boat, but fortunately I was the only one near, at a safe distance some 50 metres away, up on the cliffs. As it happened I was taking some wide shots and here you can sort of see what it looked like when it happened:

Iceberg crashing - Logy Bay

Iceberg crashing - Logy Bay

After the baby berg had fallen off, it quickly floated away allowing the big iceberg to turn over, showing its new shape. I wanted to take a few shots of the bay with both the iceberg and the baby berg so I walked out to the other side of the cliffs, when I got there a tour boat arrived on the scene. These tourists had missed the spectacle by a few minutes, this photo shows that the iceberg (which is classified as small) is still pretty big, even the bergy bit (the official name for these baby bergs) in the foreground is bigger than the tour boat:

Iceberg and bergy bit - Logy Bay

Iceberg and bergy bit - Logy Bay